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Cross-Linking for Keratoconus


Recently, the FDA approved the Avedro KXL System of corneal cross-linking for the treatment of progressive keratoconus, and Dr. Steven Koenig is the only doctor in southeastern Wisconsin currently performing this service.

What is Keratoconus?

keratoconusKeratoconus is a non-inflammatory eye condition in which the typically round dome-shaped cornea progressively thins and weakens, causing the development of a cone-like bulge and optical irregularity of the cornea. This causes “static” in your vision and can result in significant visual impairment.

Keratoconus typically first appears in individuals who are in their late teens or early twenties and may progress for 10 to 20 years before slowing or stabilizing. Each eye may be affected differently. In the early stages of keratoconus, people might experience:

  • Slight blurring of vision
  • Distortion of vision
  • Increased sensitivity to light

The cornea is responsible for focusing most of the light that comes into the eye. Therefore, abnormalities of the cornea, such as keratoconus, can have a major impact on how an individual sees the world, making simple tasks such as driving a car or reading a book very difficult.

What is Corneal Cross-Linking?

Cross-linking is a minimally invasive outpatient procedure that combines the use of ultraviolet light and riboflavin (Vitamin B2) eye drops to add stiffness to corneas that have been weakened by disease or refractive surgery. Cross-linking, which has been performed in Europe since 2003, is considered the standard of care around the world for keratoconus.

Corneal cross-linking is performed under topical anesthesia (eye drops), is minimally invasive, and has been shown to slow the progression of keratoconus in clinical trials. The early treatment of newly diagnosed patients may avoid the need for expensive custom fit contact lenses and may help many keratoconus patients avoid the need for corneal transplantation.

Is Cross-Linking Right for Me?

Patients over the age of 14 who have been diagnosed with progressive keratoconus or corneal ectasia following refractive surgery should ask their doctor about corneal cross-linking.

Corneal Cross-linking
Corneal cross-linking is performed under topical anesthesia (eye drops), is minimally invasive, and has been shown to slow the progression of keratoconus in clinical trials.

The Eye Institute and Dr. Koenig are proud to offer patients the first and only therapeutic products for corneal cross-linking that have been FDA-approved to treat progressive keratoconus. This approval offers an effective treatment for patients who, until recently, had no therapeutic options to limit the progression of this sight-threatening disease.

To learn more, please call Dr. Koenig at (414) 955-7902.

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Dr. Koenig is extremely pleasant, good natured, and has a wonderful beside manner. He was available and willing to answer any questions I had and even rang me back.

Jacqueline M.

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The Eye Institute

925 N 87th St
Milwaukee, WI 53226

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